The National Museum of the Royal Navy museums and attractions in Portsmouth, Gosport, Hartlepool and Yeovilton will re-open w/c 17 May - please check each museum for their opening days/times.

HMS Caroline remain temporarily closed.

Pre-booking is essential at all attractions. Find The Latest COVID-19 Updates Here.
 

 

News & Events

Latest Posts

  • Wednesday, 28 April 2021 - 10:10am

    We've put together a three part series on LCT 7074 to update you on her history and journey to her new forever home at the D-Day Story.

    Here's part one, join us over the next few weeks for parts two and three.

    Part 1 - Partying and Preservation 

    Some of you may have heard about LCT 7074 as a unique survivor of the D-Day Landings but did you know that after the Second World War the ship had a completely different life?

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  • Monday, 26 April 2021 - 8:00pm

    The National Museum of the Royal Navy is delighted to announce that its museums and attractions in Portsmouth, Somerset and Hartlepool will reopen from 17 May.

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  • Monday, 26 April 2021 - 6:00pm

    Operation Tiger

    In 1943, 3,000 residents were evacuated from their Slapton Sands homes. Similar to Utah Beach with its shingle slope, strip of land and a lake, it had been marked for D-Day rehearsals. From 22 – 30 April, Operation Tiger would cover all aspects of invasion, culminating in a beach landing.

    Slapton Sands. Slapton Lea to the left.

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  • Friday, 23 April 2021 - 3:00pm

    On 25 April our military colleagues in Australia and New Zealand commemorate Anzac Day. We are reminded of the role of HMS M.33 in supporting Anzac and British troops during the Gallipoli Campaign in 1915.

    The small, shallow-draft Monitors could get closer to the shore to blast Turkish positions than the traditional warships, offering some respite to the hemmed-in soldiers. Here is what the ship’s company looked like at that time.

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  • Thursday, 22 April 2021 - 11:00am

    The Zeebrugge Raid 23 April 1918

    The aim of this raid was to sink several old ships in the canal entrance at Zeebrugge to stop German U-boats from using the port.

    HMS Vindictive, along with the requisitioned Liverpool ferryboats Iris and Daffodil, carried parties of Royal Marines and sailors.

    Their job was to subdue the German defences located on the mole that protected the harbour whilst other naval personnel sank the block ships in the shipping channel.

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  • Friday, 9 April 2021 - 12:40pm

    Statement from Professor Dominic Tweddle, Director General of the National Museum of the Royal Navy. 

    We are deeply saddened to hear of the passing of HRH The Duke of Edinburgh.

    Professor Dominic Tweddle, Director General for the National Museum of the Royal Navy, said:

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