All of the National Museum of the Royal Navy museums are once again open to the public! Please note new Health & Safety measures are in place - check out each museum for further details.

Tickets are now available to buy online. Pre-booking your day and arrival time are essential. 
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News & Events

Latest Posts

  • Wednesday, 23 September 2020 - 5:56pm

    No one would have ever expected a ship to last as long as HMS Trincomalee has, let alone a ship’s figurehead. This one stayed on the vessel for over 150 years, and saw every kind of weather and climate whilst the ship sailed the world.

    The figurehead in 1906

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  • Monday, 21 September 2020 - 3:31pm

    National Museum of Royal Navy statement on redundancy consultation

    It is with deep regret that the National Museum of the Royal Navy (NMRN) is announcing that today we have started a consultation on proposed redundancies and restructuring.

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  • Monday, 21 September 2020 - 3:31pm

    National Museum of Royal Navy statement on redundancy consultation at HMS Caroline, Belfast

    It is with deep regret that the National Museum of the Royal Navy (NMRN) is announcing that today we have started a consultation on proposed redundancies at HMS Caroline.

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  • Monday, 7 September 2020 - 4:28pm

    In December last year we received the great news that the Art Fund and the Friends of HMS Trincomalee had agreed to fund the conservation and display of HMS Trincomalee’s 1845 figurehead. After some delays caused by lockdown the work is now going ahead and in this series of blogs we will give the history of the figurehead and trace the progress of the project.

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  • Saturday, 15 August 2020 - 4:00pm

    The end of the fighting did not mean the sailors of the British Pacific Fleet could relax.

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  • Saturday, 15 August 2020 - 10:15am

    After VJ Day, the role of the troops changed literally overnight from being focused on fighting to a humanitarian effort. It took many months afterwards to free and repatriate all the Prisoners of War.

    One of the first good news stories to emerge was of a young family coming together for the very first time.

    September 1945 saw not only the reunion of Petty Officer (PO) John Wight-Brown RN with his wife, but his first meeting with daughter Elizabeth-Ann, then five years old.  

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